Journalism

UNDER CONSTRUCTION…………………………………………………………………………………………

This is intended to be the “Contents” page, to give you quick access to the large collection of my past articles. As you  will see, I’ve written extensively about all facets of the maritime industry, recreational boating, and outdoor adventure sports  for over 30 years and continue today. Everything falls under three main headings:                               Sea Stories, Travel Tales, Outdoor Opinions.

Sea Stories range across the entire spectrum of activity on the water. They are broken into three categories: yachting (sport), shipping (commercial), and maritime history.

  •     Yachting:  sport sailing, ocean racing, cruising, boat building, multhulls
  • Shipping & Workboats: shipyards, tug and barge building, pilot boats, fishboats, USCG, derelicts, engines
  • Nautical History: sailing ships, replicas, early voyages of exploration, local culture
  • Plus my own adventures on my 21′ trimaran on the NW coast.from the historic monuments of Greenwich  to visits  to boat yards on the NW coast , and sailing trips along the to Alaska.
  • Travel Tales cover my bike journeys in Central and South America, western Europe. Plus my Sea-to-Summit ascents from the Pacific coast to the peaks in the Cascades,  Sierras, Mexican Plateau and Andes, and bike rides along French canals.
  • Outdoor Opinions…..Some of my trips may sound rather “extreme” to some readers, but compared to the antics of the newest generation of thrill seekers, they are really pretty tame. I’ve considered these attempts to go “farther and faster” in ever more obscure ways, and discussed them with knowledgeable friends. Our conclusion is they are literally “exercises in futility.” I will expand on this critical view on my Outdoor Skeptic Blog.
  • Photos –Thanks for your patience while I fetch them all from my archives.
  • Blog–I am resorting to the new-fangled technique of “blogging” where all my new  stories can be found by a category and tag search.
  • Sea-to-summit– When I turned 50 in 1997,  I adopted sea-to-summit climbing as a path less traveled to more excursions that expanded my experience of the Cascade Range.

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